Gdansk – 7

I continued on and read more details about the events of 14th – 17th December 1970 along the Baltic Coast commemorated in the Monument to the Shipyard Workers outside the centre. People protested at the Lenin Shipyard in Gdansk on the 14th and then on the 17th 44 people were killed at the dockyard and railway station in Gdynia. One of the people shot was Ludwik Piernicki who was coming out of the station when he was mown down by a salvo of bullets fired by security forces. The authorities claimed the bullets were ricochets but they weren’t. Ludwik’s blood-stained jacket is on display for all to see. He was carrying his blood donor card at the time of his death. The motto on the card stated “Giving blood is the greatest humanitarian act, proof of great social solidarity”. I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry when I read this – I probably should have done both.

Gdansk – Airport to city centre by train

Hello – the latest information on how to get to the city centre train station in Gdansk from the airport via the train.

The central station in Gdansk is Gdansk Glowny.

At the airport, which is named after Lech Walesa, follow the red lines painted on the ground. You will arrive at the train station. The platform closer to the airport is the one to use to get the train to Gdansk.

Buy the ticket at the machine on the platform – there is an English language option, which you obtain by pressing the Union Flag of the UK. The fare is about 6,50 zloty but you can pay with a credit card.

The train will take you to Gdańsk Wrzeszcz railway station, where you have to get off the train and head to another platform where the train to Gdansk Glowny will arrive (when I did this the train to Gdansk Glowny arrived on Platform 3).

It is three stops from Gdańsk Wrzeszcz railway station to Gdansk Glowny. The final destination of this train will almost certainly be Gdansk Śródmieście.

 

Gdansk – ul Mariacka

The above picture was taken in Gdansk today, 6th August 2018. The houses are beautiful with drain pipes, gargoyles, and windows. It’s hard to believe that this entire street and almost all of the old town of Gdansk was rebuilt after WWII based on drawings, paintings, and documents.

Dispute over ‘patriotism’ delays opening of Gdańsk’s new war museum

Poland’s conservative government has decided that the port city’s new landmark exhibiting the horrors of the second world war isn’t sufficiently nationalist