Playing Fountains

From my book on The Balkans

In the main square the fountain next to the Alexander the Great statue was now coming into its own as night fell. There were sixty small holes in the main square, six rows of ten out of which water would pour. Each hole contained a light that could switch colour. The water could either shoot out vertically, to a height of about six feet, or at an angle of about 45 degrees, so that it appeared to be jumping into another hole close by. This display of playing streams of water was choreographed to the accompanying music. The jets would play at the same height and then gradually decrease from one end to the other in a line, so one jet at the end of a line would have completely disappeared whilst the jet at the other end was still playing to a height of four feet. All the time the colours in each of the lines was changing. This fountain drew a large crowd, some of whom thought they could run through the fountain without getting wet. They were wrong.

 

Skopje plans for the future by fixating on its ancient past

Macedonia’s capital was rebuilt after the 1963 earthquake with a cutting-edge modernist vision. Now, critics say the hollow Doric columns and clumsy statues of ‘antiquitisation’ are transforming the city into a mini-Las Vegas

Skopje Fountains

In the main square the fountain next to the Alexander the Great statue was now coming into its own as night fell. There were 128 small holes in the main square, eight rows of sixteen, out of which water would shoot. Each hole contained a light that could switch colour. The water could either shoot out vertically, to a height of about six feet, or at an angle of about 45 degrees, so that it appeared to be jumping into another hole close by. This display of playing streams of water was choreographed to the accompanying music. The jets would play at the same height and then gradually decrease from one end to the other in a line, so one jet at the end of a line would have completely disappeared whilst the jet at the other end was still playing to a height of four feet. All the time the colours in each of the lines were changing. This fountain drew a large crowd, some of whom thought they could run through the fountain without getting wet. They were wrong.

Fountains in Skopje, Macedonia

If you like fountains playing to carefully choreographed music then I suggest you head for Skopje in Macedonia, where the main square has two sets of fountains dancing charmingly to classical music (excerpts from Johann Strauss and Wagner), which plays over loudspeakers attached to street lights. One fountain is in the main square and the other, about ten yards away, surrounds the vast statue of Alexander the Great, which dominates the square. The water is beautifully lit and provides passers-by with multiple photo opportunities.

10 Free things to do in Rome

10 Free things to do in Rome:

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2014/may/06/top-10-free-things-to-do-rome-italy