Take the kids to … Western Approaches, Liverpool War Museum

A reopened secret wartime bunker that was used by Churchill and staffed by WRNS and WAAF personnel offers an educational day out – and the cheapest cup of tea in the land.

Nick Ut: a career in photography – in pictures

Associated Press photographer Nick Ut took one of the most famous photographs of all time – of a young girl running along a road in Vietnam after a napalm raid. But during his 51 years as a press photographer, Ut worked as a staff photographer, covering many and varied assignments

Dispute over ‘patriotism’ delays opening of Gdańsk’s new war museum

Poland’s conservative government has decided that the port city’s new landmark exhibiting the horrors of the second world war isn’t sufficiently nationalist

Mostar – Triangular War memorial

If the visitor just sees the area around the Turkish bridge, they would find it difficult to believe there was ever a war in Mostar. To find this evidence the visitor should walk past the Karadozbeg Mosque and the Roznamendi Effendi Mosque to the Musala Bridge and look at the ruins of the Neretva Hotel. 80% of Mostar was destroyed during the Balkans War and the ruined buildings in the area of the hotel bear witness to this devastation. The Bosnian Muslim elements within Mostar and the Croats were allies against the Serbs and when the latter were defeated there was peace in the city for roughly a year, before fighting between Bosnians and Croats began with the front line being the street called Kralja Zvonimira.

Walking along this street, the visitor can see the bullet holes in some of the buildings, but otherwise the only evidence of a battle is the Ljubljanska Banka building on the corner. This monstrosity, with its triangular point jutting towards the river a few hundred yards away, is pockmarked with bullet holes that at least give the building some character and interest, which I hope preserves it for future generations to see and remember what happened here. Most war memorials are small and easily missed, but surely no one could miss this ugly, nine-storey, triangular shaped memorial?

Dubrovnik – Mount Srd

Dubrovnik’s cable-car runs from the north of the city walls to the top of Mount Srd in just under four minutes. The top of the mountain is 405 metres above the city and the views from the cable-car station are stupendous, although the best views are from the roof of the Napoleonic Fort, which houses the Homeland War Museum, to the west of the cable-car station. Here the visitor can see Dubrovnik and the coastline without the paraphernalia from the cable-car system getting in the way. The museum is worth devoting time to as the exhibits clearly show the Serbs, on nearby Mount Zarkovica, targeting the old town of Dubrovnik with fly-by-wire missiles, artillery shells, and machine-gun fire. Naval vessels also shelled Dubrovnik. 56% of the buildings in the old town were damaged and 116 people died.