The Manton Rempville Murders – Chapter 1

Detective Sergeant Rod Barnes surveyed the remains of Manton Rempville monastery with a certain amount of incredulity. He’d heard that 100,000 pounds had been spent on preserving the ruins and he couldn’t understand why anyone would do such a thing. Ruins were ruins for a reason and that reason was because the natural order of things, in Barnes’s mind at least, was gradual decay – preservation was only delaying the inevitable, like applying skin cream to wrinkles or a new coat of paint to a rusting car. The ruins were open to anyone and there was no entry charge, so they were never going to get their money back.

Barnes stiffened slightly as he saw DI Colin Knowles’s Land Rover chug into the car park and lurch to a halt too close to Barnes’s Morgan sports car for his comfort. He glanced down at the body and thought that Knowles would find this crime scene very interesting indeed. Knowles was on a new diet and his latest culinary delight was vegetable kebabs cooked on his nearly new barbecue. Even in the depths of winter.

Barnes walked across the uneven grass as a low, cold wind whipped across the historical site. He hadn’t seen much of Knowles in the past month as they’d both been away on holiday at separate times.

“Good morning, sir, how are you today?”

“Fair to middling, Barnesy old son, the diet’s working well, nearly ten pounds lost.”

“How’s the gym going?”

“Gradually doing more on the treadmill, lifting a few weights, and getting some stretching done on those large blue balls they have. That’s not easy – those balls are bouncy as hell – I almost fell off the first few times I tried to lie on the thing. Anyway, not only can I see my toes now, but I can almost touch them too.”

“That’s good to hear, sir. The trick to keeping the weight off is by committing to a lifestyle change rather thinking you’re on a diet.”

“Good point, Sergeant, lifestyle sounds very magazine like though, very posh Sunday newspaperish, but I know what you mean. Anyway, who or what do we have over there.”

The two men started to walk over to the eastern wall of the monastery’s refectory where the body had been found an hour earlier by Bingo the retriever, out on a long walk with his owner Adelaide Hills from Goat Parva. Both dog and owner were well known to the police from a few weeks previously when Bingo had made a habit of finding bodies in the early morning.

“According to his credit cards, his name is Edward Morgan; we are just running some computer checks to find out where he lives. It’s how he’s been killed that you will find interesting, sir.”

Knowles stood on what remained of the wall and looked down at the body lying on what would have been the refectory floor. Edward Morgan had been run through with a sword and the handle was sticking out of his back on the left-hand side. Knowles smiled at Dr Crabtree, the forensic doctor, who was examining the body.

“Dr Crabtree, we have a real sword being used as a murder weapon?”

“We do, Colin, a very real sword. This is a heavy cavalry sword with a straight blade with one cutting edge whereas the other side has been thickened for greater strength. The blade is around three feet in length. It directly penetrated his heart and he would have died instantly.”

“Any prints on the handle?”

“We’ll check back at the lab, Colin, can we move him now?”

“Yes, that will be all I think. We’ll be back at the station in an hour or so; could you have something by then in terms of fingerprints, time of death, and any ideas on a profile of who could have done it?”

“We’ll try Colin – no promises, but we’ll try.”

“I presume the person who murdered Edward wasn’t aware of the type of sword they were using, “ said Barnes, “because that’s a sword for slashing people with, not for running them through.”

“So, you would have expected a murderer who knew what he/she was using to have hit Edward here in the neck with the sharp side,” replied Knowles.

“Yes, sir, that’s correct.”

“So we’re looking for an ignorant murderer then? We show the suspects the sword and ask them how they would kill someone using the sword and those who opt for the neck slash are innocent?”

“They might be bluffing sir, so we shouldn’t just use that as a method of elimination from our enquiries,” said Barnes, playing along with Knowles’ quite acerbic sense of humour.

“OK, we’ll just confine ourselves to telling the murderer, when we catch them, that they murdered Edward here in the wrong way. So where could the sword have come from? It’s not the sort of weapon you can easily conceal.”

“The nearest house is Manton Rempville Hall – you can see it just poking through the trees over there. That might be the best place to start.”

“Agreed – they probably keep an assortment of weapons to keep the staff subdued and repel invasions by the local peasants in times of crisis. We should go there after visiting our oldest friend in Goat Parva, Mrs Adelaide Hills, and her bundle of fun Bingo.”

“It’s just like old times, sir.”

“Indeed it is, Barnesy, I just hope that this is the only body that Bingo finds in this murder investigation.”

Continues…

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